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Why Face-to-Face Interactions Are Much More Effective

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The world became more and more virtual with all the alternative communication means we use every day. We tweet, email, have global conversation calls and we are all overwhelmed with messages, emails, texts, tweets, updating our LinkedIn and Facebook profile, and we live in the illusion that we’re actually having meetings, yet nothing beats the power of a truly personal relationship, face-to-face connection. If you think about it, when was the last time you truly earned a client only because you had a great post on LinkedIn?

In a face-to-face interaction you can truly listen to your client and understand what he or she really need opposed to any other communication via the phone or email.

Don’t get me wrong, a phone conversation can open doors and give you the first incline if you are on the right track or wasting your time yet real close interactions with your colleagues or clients can be built only through personal interaction, where you can truly get to know each other and we all know well that our stronger business relationships were built when we met and talked face-to-face.

face to face meeting

In a face-to-face meeting we get the chance to read the body language of our colleagues and clients; their body, tone of voice and facial expressions often communicate so much more than just words. Studies show that only a small percent of our communication involves actual words: 7%. In fact, 55% of our communication is visual (body language and facial expressions) and 38% is vocal (pitch, speed, volume, and tone of voice). Therefore the face-to-face interaction is much more effective.

en Chernin / The Associated Press Former President Bill Clinton, left, talks with actor and founder of Make It Right, Brad Pitt, during the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting on Thursday in New York.

In a face-to-face interaction we can support our verbal message with our body language, for example, the former President Bill Clinton was known as a very capable public speaker.  Much of what he said in his speeches was communicated with hand gestures.  Gestures are a very powerful way to amplify one’s intentions in public speaking.  They also serve as a channel to bring the audience into the speech (which Clinton excelled in).  This is also one of the reasons why Clinton’s supporters or even non supporters believed what he said at the time.  His gestures aided his overall credibility.


Power of smile

In a face-to-face interaction we smile, the smile has a huge impact on meetings’ result. A smile is an invitation; a sign of welcome. Smiling directly influence how other people respond to you. The human brain prefers happy faces and recognizes them faster than those with negative expressions. In fact, research shows that if you smile at someone it activates the “reward center” in that person’s brain. It is also a natural response for the other person to smile back at you.

Nothing beats the power of a truly personal face-to-face relationship, and it’s much more effective in creating stronger relationships.
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The Body Language Cards, a simple, easy, and effective way to learn the secrets of body language, to know what others really think and feel and  improve communication and life skills.
   

The Tale of Three Tells!

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1. Tell them what you're going to tell them.

2. Tell them.
3. Tell them what you told them.

try to focus on no more than 5 points and make sure my audience is with me all the way.

Try to make it perosnal.


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Presentation Advantage with Top Tips from Body Language

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Presentation Advantage with Top Tips from Body Language

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Body language cards teach workers non-verbal cues that position them for hiring

LOS GATOS, Calif., Jan. 25, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --  Your body language during an interview may be revealing things to a potential boss that you didn't know. The interviewer's body language also can reveal what he/she is thinking. Learning how to use and read non-verbal cues can give job seekers a clear advantage over other contenders.

"Job seekers invest a lot in preparation for an interview: new clothes; perfect hair and nails; company research, and role playing the interview so they have all the right answers. But knowing how to use non-verbal cues and communication to build trust and confidence is just as important," said Gil Shermeister, behavioral zoologist that 12 years ago co-invented the Body Language Cards, a method used in the training of executives, sales forces and professional security personnel.

Shermeister's top six interview tips include:

  1. When entering, people tend to create an imaginary barrier to protect themselves by clutching a handbag or crossing their arms. To the interviewer this "says" insecurity. Keep an open body stance (no crossed arms or legs) and maintain eye contact.
  2. Avoid making the upper hand handshake which indicates a need to dominate.
  3. If interviewed by several people, always identify the decision-maker. This is the person others glance at when they are finished talking. Direct comments/replies to the decision-maker.
  4. Under stress people instinctively tend to protect the main artery. In modern society it is manifested by touching the tie or playing with a necklace (image) Don't fidget with jewelry or garments in this way.
  5. The interviewer may reveal a need for more information by putting an object in his/her mouth or motioning with a pen or the tip of the glasses (image). Take the cue and provide more details.
  6. If the interviewer puts his fingers together (pyramid-like), this may indicate an attempt to "connect the dots" (image). Another good sign is when the interviewer rubs his hands together. Both gestures indicate satisfaction.
   

Presentation Advantage with Top Tips from Body Language

PDFPrintE-mail

Presentation Advantage with Top Tips from Body Language

1
1

Body language cards teach workers non-verbal cues that position them for hiring

LOS GATOS, Calif., Jan. 25, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --  Your body language during an interview may be revealing things to a potential boss that you didn't know. The interviewer's body language also can reveal what he/she is thinking. Learning how to use and read non-verbal cues can give job seekers a clear advantage over other contenders.

"Job seekers invest a lot in preparation for an interview: new clothes; perfect hair and nails; company research, and role playing the interview so they have all the right answers. But knowing how to use non-verbal cues and communication to build trust and confidence is just as important," said Gil Shermeister, behavioral zoologist that 12 years ago co-invented the Body Language Cards, a method used in the training of executives, sales forces and professional security personnel.

Shermeister's top six interview tips include:

  1. When entering, people tend to create an imaginary barrier to protect themselves by clutching a handbag or crossing their arms. To the interviewer this "says" insecurity. Keep an open body stance (no crossed arms or legs) and maintain eye contact.
  2. Avoid making the upper hand handshake which indicates a need to dominate.
  3. If interviewed by several people, always identify the decision-maker. This is the person others glance at when they are finished talking. Direct comments/replies to the decision-maker.
  4. Under stress people instinctively tend to protect the main artery. In modern society it is manifested by touching the tie or playing with a necklace (image) Don't fidget with jewelry or garments in this way.
  5. The interviewer may reveal a need for more information by putting an object in his/her mouth or motioning with a pen or the tip of the glasses (image). Take the cue and provide more details.
  6. If the interviewer puts his fingers together (pyramid-like), this may indicate an attempt to "connect the dots" (image). Another good sign is when the interviewer rubs his hands together. Both gestures indicate satisfaction.
   

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